Aeristech part of Cummins-led consortium that will accelerate the development of air handling technologies for hybrid and fuel cell powertrains

Huddersfield, U.K. — Cummins Inc. (NYSE: CMI), the lead organisation of a consortium focused on decarbonising heavy-duty powertrains, announced today that the Government and industry funded project, TRIDENT will accelerate British development of air handling technologies by three years. The funding allows Cummins and its partners to allocate additional engineers and resources to develop new air handling technologies for hybrid and fuel cell powertrains.

Aligned with U.K. Government ambitions, the collaborative project led by Cummins, seeks to reduce CO2 emissions and improve air quality by building a U.K. supply chain for the next generation of heavy-duty turbochargers.

Cummins, a leading supplier of turbocharger technology for more than 60 years with rich company heritage derived from the Holset brand, is well-positioned to lead the consortium with partners University of Bath, Holtex Ltd and Aeristech. Brett Fathauer, Executive Director – Research & Engineering for Cummins Turbo Technologies said, “The funding that Cummins and our partners received from the Advanced Propulsion Centre is critical to helping us deliver CO2 and fuel consumption improvements across a variety of power solutions.”

“Additionally, we expect to accelerate our development of air handling technologies for hybrid and fuel cell powertrains by three years, as we continue our focus on developing and offering technologies that are better for our customers, the environment and our communities.”

The TRIDENT project supports the U.K.’s long-term capabilities to reduce CO2 and improve air quality for future generations, a clear ambition which is a focus for all levels of Government. This was once again highlighted at the recent G7 Summit in Cornwall where world leaders stood by the ongoing global commitment to halve global emissions by 2030 and reach net-zero carbon emissions by 2050.

While immediate purchases of on-highway zero-emission vehicles remain focused on cars and buses, investment in long-term research and development is critical to meeting the demands of heavy-duty applications and aligning with zero-emission targets.

Duncan Kerr, CEO of Aeristech, said: “Working with Cummins in a partnership of this caliber is an outstanding opportunity to use our electric motor technologies in next-generation powertrains for hydrogen-fuel cell powered vehicles. Our technologies deliver the high performance and efficiency needed to increase the power output of the fuel cell by forcing air into the fuel cell engine using an electrically driven turbocharger. These hydrogen fuel cell systems are zero emission and we’re delighted to be working with Cummins to jointly develop new green technology solutions.”

Announced as a recipient of funding from the Advanced Propulsion Centre in June last year, as part of the latest round of Government and industry funding for low-carbon emissions research, the announcement comes as the U.K. starts counting down towards the UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26), held in Glasgow later this year with more than 200 world leaders due to discuss climate action.

Jon Beasley, Business Development and Programmes Director at the Advanced Propulsion Centre, added ‘‘We are delighted to be working with the Trident project consortium. It’s an exciting time for the U.K. automotive industry as the country hosts world leaders for both the G7 and COP26 summits, it provides an opportunity to demonstrate how we are focussed on tackling climate change and taking significant steps towards clean mobility.”

“Our funded projects accelerate the development of low and zero-emissions technology, enabling solutions that can play a role in the decarbonisation of transport on a global scale. The Trident partners will be working together to advance the technologies that will not only move us toward 2050 targets, but also safeguard and create jobs within the U.K. automotive supply chain.” Building on extensive cutting-edge developments in every major component and subsystem across the mechanical and e-machines domains, Cummins and the consortium partners aim to create a game-changing energy recovery platform which delivers CO2 and fuel consumption improvements across a variety of sustainable power solutions, understanding that electric alone may not be suitable for some applications.

Aeristech joins H2GEAR, collaborating to develop a ground-breaking hydrogen propulsion system powering aircraft

GKN Aerospace will lead a ground-breaking UK collaboration programme, called H2GEAR, to develop the company’s first hydrogen propulsion system for sub-regional aircraft. Hydrogen is expected to play a key role in the decarbonisation strategy of aviation as it can power aircraft efficiently, leaving water as the only by-product. H2GEAR puts GKN Aerospace at the heart of the technology developments needed for the future of more sustainable aviation. The technology will first focus on significantly improving sub-regional aircraft hydrogen powered performance, in turn enabling applications on larger aircraft and longer journeys. The programme is supported by £27M of ATI funding, matched by GKN Aerospace and its industrial partners.

H2GEAR aims to develop a liquid hydrogen propulsion system for sub-regional aircraft that could be scaled up to larger aircraft. Liquid hydrogen is being converted to electricity within a fuel cell system. This electricity efficiently powers the aircraft, eliminating CO2 emissions. This would create a new generation of clean air travel, eliminating harmful CO2 emissions.

H2GEAR will reinforce the UK’s position at the forefront of aerospace technology research and development. GKN Aerospace will collaborate with Intelligent EnergyAeristechNewcastle University, The University of Manchester and University of Birmingham, throughout the programme, aiming to create more than 3,000 jobs in the next decade. The programme will be delivered from GKN Aerospace’s Global Technology Centre in Bristol, the company’s £32M brand-new collaborative space for research and development.

Russ Dunn, Chief Technology Officer for GKN Aerospace, said; “Hydrogen-powered aircraft offer a clear route to keep the world connected, with dramatically cleaner skies. The UK is at the forefront of this technology, and the H2GEAR project is an example of industry, academia and Government collaboration at its best. Working with our partners, and made possible by Government investment, GKN Aerospace will develop and industrialise the breakthrough technology to fly aircraft with zero CO2 emissions by the mid-2020s. This will not only create thousands of jobs, but it will keep the UK at the forefront of the next generation of cleaner air travel for decades to come.”

Duncan Kerr, CEO of Aeristech, said: “This is a truly ground-breaking programme for hydrogen technology, bringing together some of the UK’s most established organisations for a cutting edge clean aviation solution. Aeristech’s world leading power dense and efficient compressor technology will play a vital role in powering GKN Aerospace’ first hydrogen propulsion system, helping to bring hydrogen-powered air travel closer to reality.”

David Woolhouse, CEO at Intelligent Energy, said: “We have a very exciting programme of work over the next few years, including developing leading lightweight fuel cell modules for aerospace. This programme will see us develop the next generation of fuel cell technology and supports the growth of manufacturing right here in the East Midlands.  We are planning to increase our manufacturing capability with a new state-of-the-art Gigafactory facility in the region, positioning the East Midlands as a centre of hydrogen fuel cell manufacturing in the UK. The entry-into-service of the first hydrogen-powered aircraft could be as early as 2026.”

 GKN Aerospace will use its long term experience and in-depth knowledge of electrical power systems and propulsion technology to accelerate the development of technology. The entry-into- service of the first hydrogen-powered aircraft could be as early as 2026.

For more information, contact Hoda Awad here.

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